Orenitram® (treprostinil) extended-release tablets—Planning ahead to help you capture more good days

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by United Therapeutics |

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Starting a new treatment can feel intimidating, but you won’t face this challenge alone. You have resources to help you manage your pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Your healthcare provider will be there to help you prepare for side effects and ensure you get the most out of your PAH treatment.

More good days start with Orenitram, an oral medication proven to delay the progression of PAH that may help you do more with fewer symptoms.

Who should not take Orenitram?

Do not take Orenitram if you have severe liver problems.

What should I tell my healthcare provider before taking Orenitram?

Tell your healthcare provider:

  • If you have liver problems or diverticulosis.
  • If you are pregnant, breastfeeding, and/or plan to become pregnant or breastfeed. It is not known if Orenitram will harm your unborn baby or if Orenitram passes into your breast milk. Talk to your healthcare provider about the best way to feed your baby during treatment with Orenitram.
  • About all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Orenitram and other medicines may affect each other causing side effects. Do not start any new medicine until you check with your healthcare provider. Especially tell your healthcare provider if you take another medicine that contains treprostinil, such as Remodulin® or Tyvaso®.

Please see Important Safety Information for Orenitram at the end of this article.

“It’s like I can do more activities without getting shortness of breath or feeling like I’m getting weak.”
—An Orenitram patient

How Orenitram can help

PAH is a progressive disease with symptoms that can occur when blood vessels in the lungs narrow. These symptoms, like shortness of breath and fatigue, can limit your participation in daily activities. Orenitram works differently than other oral PAH medications you may already take. That’s why adding it to your treatment plan could be an important next step your doctor may take to help control your PAH and help you do more with fewer symptoms.

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Orenitram can help improve your capacity to do activities, reduce strain on your heart, decrease shortness of breath, and increase your ability to walk farther.*

*In a clinical study that included 690 patients who were all taking a single oral PAH medicine (PDE-5i, sGCS, or ERA). At the beginning of the study, these patients added either Orenitram or placebo to their treatment.

In a clinical study that included 349 patients not taking any PAH therapy. At the beginning of the study, these patients began taking either Orenitram or placebo.

What could Orenitram do for you? Learn more >

Taking Orenitram, it helps me—I’m still able to shop at the mall instead of going online. I can do an exercise or just walk around because it helps my breathing, too.
–An Orenitram patient

Read what other patients say about Orenitram or watch videos documenting their personal treatment journeys. Watch now >

Develop a plan to help you capture more good days

Because of the way Orenitram works, it’s possible you may experience side effects before seeing the benefits of therapy. By planning ahead, you can address potential side effects and stay on track with therapy.

Your healthcare provider will talk to you about possible side effects. Orenitram’s most common side effects include headache, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, flushing, and pain in the arms, legs, and jaw.

Working with your HCP to help manage potential side effects

When you start Orenitram, your doctor will increase your treatment dosage slowly. This process, known as titration, gradually gets your body used to the therapy. Your doctor may adjust your dosage depending on your response to treatment.

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What to remember when taking Orenitram:

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  • Take Orenitram exactly as instructed
  • Space your Orenitram dose evenly, every 8 hours (3 times a day)
  • Take Orenitram with a meal or snack to help address side effects
  • Have a plan to manage side effects ahead of time to help increase your chance of treatment success

Orenitram may also be taken 2 times a day (every 12 hours). Tablet strength may be increased depending on how well you tolerate treatment. Follow the dosing instructions provided to you by your healthcare provider.

Your healthcare provider may recommend some of the options below to help manage possible side effects.

 

Headache Nausea and Vomiting Diarrhea
  • Acetaminophen
  • Ibuprofen
  • Take with food
  • Anti-nausea or anti-vomiting medicine
  • Add fiber to your diet
  • Anti-diarrhea medicine

 

United Therapeutics does not provide medical advice. Your healthcare provider will help you develop a plan to manage your side effects.

Call your healthcare provider for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at www.fda.gov/MedWatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

“Before I started Orenitram, I noticed that I was short of breath. Now, I do see a difference.”
—An Orenitram patient

Tracking your side effects

Writing down how you’re feeling each day may help you manage treatment and keep track of what to discuss with your healthcare provider.

Download the daily treatment journal and tracker and share the information with your healthcare provider.

Learn how Luisa works with her healthcare team to get to her target dose and help manage side effects. Watch video >

United Therapeutics offers a number of useful resources available for download.

Helpful links from United Therapeutics to learn more about Orenitram:

ERA=endothelin receptor antagonist; PDE-5i=phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor; sGCS=soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION FOR ORENITRAM

Who should not take Orenitram?

Do not take Orenitram if you have severe liver problems.

What should I tell my healthcare provider before taking Orenitram?

Tell your healthcare provider:

  • If you have liver problems or diverticulosis.
  • If you are pregnant, breastfeeding, and/or plan to become pregnant or breastfeed. It is not known if Orenitram will harm your unborn baby or if Orenitram passes into your breast milk. Talk to your healthcare provider about the best way to feed your baby during treatment with Orenitram.
  • About all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Orenitram and other medicines may affect each other causing side effects. Do not start any new medicine until you check with your healthcare provider. Especially tell your healthcare provider if you take another medicine that contains treprostinil, such as Remodulin® or Tyvaso®.

How should I take Orenitram?

  • Do not change your dose or suddenly stop taking Orenitram without first talking to your healthcare provider.
  • Orenitram is usually taken 3 times a day (about every 8 hours) or 2 times a day (about every 12 hours). Your healthcare provider will tell you how often you should take Orenitram. If you have side effects, your healthcare provider may tell you to change your dose or when you take Orenitram. Take Orenitram with food.
  • Swallow Orenitram tablets whole. Do not split, chew, crush, or break your Orenitram tablets. Do not take Orenitram tablets that are damaged or broken. If Orenitram tablets are not taken whole, they may release too much medicine at one time. This can lead to side effects.
  • If you miss your dose of Orenitram, take the missed dose as soon as possible with food.
  • If you miss 2 or more doses of Orenitram, call your healthcare provider to see if you need to change your dose.
  • If you take too much Orenitram, call your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away.
  • You may see the tablet shell in your stools (bowel movements). This is usually normal. The tablet shell is not digested. If you have diverticulosis, the tablet shell may get stuck in a blind pouch or diverticulum in your intestine.

What are the possible side effects of Orenitram?

Orenitram can cause serious side effects, including worsening of PAH symptoms.

  • Stopping Orenitram suddenly may cause worsening of your PAH symptoms. Do not change your dose or suddenly stop taking Orenitram without first talking to your healthcare provider.
  • The most common side effects of Orenitram include headache, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, flushing, and pain in arms, legs, and jaw. These are not all of the possible side effects of Orenitram. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effect that bothers you or does not go away.
  • Call your healthcare provider for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at fda.gov/MedWatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is Orenitram?

Orenitram is a prescription medicine used to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) which is high blood pressure in the arteries of your lungs. Orenitram can help slow down the progression of your disease and improve your ability to exercise. It is not known if Orenitram is safe and effective in children.

The risk information provided here is not comprehensive. To learn more about Orenitram, talk with your healthcare provider.

Please see Full Prescribing Information and Patient Information at www.orenitram.com or call Customer Service at 1-877-UNITHER (1-877-864-8437).

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Orenitram is a registered trademark of United Therapeutics Corporation.

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