Pulmonary Hypertension PrognosisOnce a person is diagnosed with pulmonary hypertension, it may take a considerable amount of time to determine the best therapy and course of action.

Since there are a number of causes for PH, the therapies can be complex and require repeated follow-up care. Patients may have to have their therapy changed if and when it becomes ineffective.

Unfortunately, there is currently no cure for PH. However, early diagnosis makes it easier to control and ensures a better quality of life.

It was once thought that PH was a disease that primarily affected women of childbearing age, but it is now known that it can affect many ages and races. But older women still account for the majority of cases and decedents with this condition.

Depending on when a person is diagnosed and the particular type of PH they have, the mortality rate can be as high as 90 percent within three to five years.

Read about the 5 Different Classes of PH.

Note: Pulmonary Hypertension News is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

Patrícia holds her PhD in Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases from the Leiden University Medical Center in Leiden, The Netherlands. She has studied Applied Biology at Universidade do Minho and was a postdoctoral research fellow at Instituto de Medicina Molecular in Lisbon, Portugal. Her work has been focused on molecular genetic traits of infectious agents such as viruses and parasites.
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Özge has a MSc. in Molecular Genetics from the University of Leicester and a PhD in Developmental Biology from Queen Mary University of London. She worked as a Post-doctoral Research Associate at the University of Leicester for six years in the field of Behavioural Neurology before moving into science communication. She worked as the Research Communication Officer at a London based charity for almost two years.
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Patrícia holds her PhD in Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases from the Leiden University Medical Center in Leiden, The Netherlands. She has studied Applied Biology at Universidade do Minho and was a postdoctoral research fellow at Instituto de Medicina Molecular in Lisbon, Portugal. Her work has been focused on molecular genetic traits of infectious agents such as viruses and parasites.