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    • #11752
      Kathleen Sheffer
      Participant

      Brain fog, not a medical condition itself, is a symptom of many medical conditions, including pulmonary hypertension. Brain fog involves memory problems, poor concentration and general mental fatigue.

      Brain fog can also be a side effect of medications, and I experience it as a result of my immunosuppressant regimen since transplant. I’ve developed some strategies to keep it in check, including maintaining a regular sleep schedule and taking notes. For a couple months after my transplant I sent myself text messages each time I took a medication so I would have a log of what I had taken and wouldn’t forget or repeat any of them.

      Do you experience brain fog? What are some ways you combat it?

    • #11756
      Brittany Foster
      Keymaster

      I can so relate to this!!! I find that sometimes my beta blocker medication will add to the brain fog and of course being low on oxygen doesn’t help! I experience it and get embarrassed when I am corrected on repeating myself or forgetting. The kids that I nanny pick up on it a lot! They will always say “Britt, you told us the same thing this morning!” Or they finish my sentences for me and laugh saying “you just said that!” I usually laugh along with them but inside I’m like, “Wow, I don’t remember!” I’ve had neurocognitive testing done that tracks different brain functions to make sure I am not declining. I get it done every few years or sooner if I notice more changes or if my family notices I’m more forgetful. Especially if it starts affecting my health and things like forgetting medications! Brain fog is no joke!

    • #11796
      Beverly Repouille
      Participant

      Amen, ladies!!!

    • #11905
      KRISTINE
      Participant

      I think mine goes beyond brain fog. My short-term memory is just AWOL (absent without leave). My family, nor my boss have any understanding regarding memory issues and how this condition affects memory.

    • #11921
      Robin Taylor
      Participant

      Yes. I first attributed to just getting older (I’m 56), but it’s been a lot more obvious since my diagnosis. It’s affecting my short term and long term memories as well as day to day functionality (I survive with lists and calendars). It’s most frustrating when I can’t find the word or name I want to use or forgetting my two o’clock med after turning off my phone alarm (how can you forget something in minutes or even seconds???).

      • #11945
        Brittany Foster
        Keymaster

        Hi all! curious if anyone who has responded to this sees a neurologist. I know you’re probably thinking that you don’t want to have another doctor to have to go too and testing to be done. I see a neuro who works well with the heart and PH team and who knows that my memory is from these conditions. I had neurocognitive testing done. It was a few hours long and testing things like long term memory, short term, reaction time, speed, concentration, etc. The results of the test take a few weeks to come back but with the results a neuropsych will tell you the patterns they see in your results, the likely cause based on your medical history, ways to help (such as lists, pill organizers etc) and can give you a baseline of where your memory is at and things to be aware of if you or others see it progressing. It was very helpful for me ! Maybe worth asking about ?

    • #11949
      Beverly Repouille
      Participant

      Interesting thought! Thanks for sharing!

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