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    • #24955
      Colleen Steele
      Keymaster

      In my column this week I discussed the power of words. What word(s) holds great power, meaning and emotion in your heart? Are you careful about how and when you use them? How about when someone describes you as strong or a hero? How do you react to words like that when they are directed at you? Are there words that hold a certain power over you that you wish didn’t?

      Think about it and share your “words” with us.

       

    • #24961
      Jen Cueva
      Moderator

      Beautifully written @colleensteele. I love this piece, too. Your writing brings such meaning to me when I read them. I always leave feeling uplifted. Knowing you, this is precisely what I would feel if I were leaving your home. Another word when I think of you is grace.

      I tend to hold on to some of your favorite words, especially hope, faith, family, and love. I also have to add gratitude. I have used these words even more since my PH diagnosis. I tend to see all of the little things to be grateful for.

      I hate that you felt guilty for Cullen having PH and happy that that has dissolved. I dislike that word idiopathic as well. It does sound ugly. But, I am grateful that he had idiopathic PH and was eligible for the transplant.

      I think that one word or saying that I tend to dislike is “got their wings.” Too often, I hear this as PH friends pass away. Does anyone else tend to dislike this phrase?

    • #24971
      Colleen Steele
      Keymaster

      Thank you @jenc. There were some many other words I could have added to the column – gratitude or thankful are two of them. “Got their wings” is used often when PHamily passes. I know part of it is because people try to avoid the word died. Personally, when someone dies I don’t think there is any word that can distract from the painful reality of it.

    • #24978
      Jen Cueva
      Moderator

      I bet @colleensteele; I enjoyed that column just as you wrote it!

      When I see ” got their wings,” I understand they are saying, another angel got their wings. Maybe it’s just that the person died and I don’t like seeing that. I know that some prefer to say, ” passed,” I don’t like that term either. Maybe it’s like you mention, no matter the time used, the pain is still there. Another reason is possibly my work in hospice care, where we talked about death and dying daily. I hope some of this makes sense.

    • #24998
      Colleen Steele
      Keymaster

      @jenc I understand what you are saying. I know way too many who have died from PH, several were close friends to Cullen, and still, I am at a loss of what to say when we lose someone. “Passed” is a word that I often use but I tend to stay away from the angel reference, especially if I don’t know what religious beliefs a family has. I try to be respectful of that. I have known a lot of parents though who prefer the thought of their child now having their angel wings.

      When it comes to death words are hard to find.

    • #25006
      Jen Cueva
      Moderator

      Well said, @colleensteele. You always have the gentle but straightforward terms to use. I can understand how “passed” would be OK to most all. But I also can understand why some parents or family like to refer to their loved ones as angels. I believe that we are all angels when we leave here. But, not all agree with that, that is OK, too.

      Thank you for always being so gentle and comforting.

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