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    • #21701
      Brittany Foster
      Keymaster

      Every time I go to a doctor’s office, especially a new doctor, I am given a form to fill out with a medication list on it. Sometimes all the medications I am on just come to my head so easily, but other times I have brain fog and can easily forget the names of some of the medications and treatments.

      Something that has helped me is to have an app on my phone for medical purposes. There is a health app on Samsung phones that I use that allows me to write down my medications. Whenever I get prescribed a new medication, even if it is just for a short amount of time (like antibiotics) I like to have the name and dosage and frequency of the medication listed. It helps me so that I don’t forget during an appointment. It’s also good to have on hand in case of emergency to give to others.

      Do you do something to help you remember all the medications you or your family member may be taking? Is there a particular app that you like to use for this information or do you write it or type it out and keep it with you? What works best for you?

    • #21716
      Jen Cueva
      Participant

      That’s a cool idea, Brittany. As some of y’all know, I was not tech-savvy but learning. I’m starting to use my Google Calendar some. I also use notes on my phone.

      When my meds change, I actually have to add it to a printed list that I carry on me. It’s on my computer and I write the medication, dosage, doctor, etc.. This is more time consuming than your suggestion, so I may start transitions there, too.

      I’m looking for all the time-saving tips and shortcuts. HeHe

      • #21725
        Brittany Foster
        Keymaster

        technology can be a big help for this, but it is also important for me to update hard copies and print outs of information too . I usually will ask for an updated list after doctor appointments too that I can keep on me or give to others in case of an emergency. I think that in an emergency situation more people will look for something more tangible that they can hand over vs going through a phone that may have passwords etc on it making it less accessible and readily available. (this is why I don’t do passwords etc on my phone)

      • #21805
        Erika S ELlis
        Participant

        I use the MedList Pro app to keep track of taking medications and all of the my issue and medicines.

        • #21815
          Colleen Steele
          Keymaster

          Erika, I will have to take a look at that app. Thanks for the tip!

        • #21816
          Colleen Steele
          Keymaster

          Erika, I will have to take a look at that app. Thanks for the tip!

        • #21828
          Brittany Foster
          Keymaster

          Erika,
          I will have to check out this app! do you know if it is free to download? I use the healthmate app because I have healthmate devices like a pulse ox reader, blood pressure and heart rate monitor and it takes digital recordings after it measures it and stores the information. It is helpful when I am showing my doctors trends or when I am having symptoms during a particular time. Does your app allow you to track your vital signs, even if you have to input the data manually?

    • #21739
      Colleen Steele
      Keymaster

      I keep an updated word document of Cullen’s med list that is shared with the family. I also keep a print-out of it on our fridge, in my purse, in the glove compartment of our car and in the zip lock baggy with all of his med bottles.

      When we go to appointments or the hospital I bring extra copies to hand out to nurses and doctors and they always appreciate it. Not only does it list the name of the medication but also what it is taken for and on what day’s and times he takes them and what side effects he can experience with them.

      Cullen, his dad and I have our cell’s programmed to alarm the 3 times a day that he is due for meds.

      That’s about all that we do but it has worked well.

    • #21743
      Barb Jensen
      Participant

      HEY, Colleen, I found this forum finally!
      I just wondered if any of you have a medic alert bracelet with a USB in it? It is silicone, has a slot on the underside that holds a little USB. It is water proof, so you don’t have to remove it for the shower. the USB comes with a page that you can fill in on the computer, but I always had more to include than there was room for, so, since I already had my personal info, allergies, medical history on Word, I downloaded it onto the USB. I had all my meds put on Excel and I downloaded it too (Meds, dosages, how and when I take each, MD’s name, etc). Whenever I have a change of any kind, I can go to the excel on the computer and change it, very easy. If I have a Dr. appointment, I run off the updated version and take it with me. They REALLY appreciate having it all written down and updated!
      When I went into the hospital, my friend instructed the staff to get the USB, they plugged it into their computer, and they had all my info that fast. This saved my life twice in June. I was amazed, however, that most ER staff had never seen it.
      If I knew how to include a couple images, I would, but no luck so far!!
      Barb

      • #21744
        Colleen Steele
        Keymaster

        @bjjensen52gmail-com I misunderstood the problem you were having. I thought you tried to comment and it wasn’t going through. Sorry about that.

        Yes, when my son had PH I did use the USB that you mentioned. I also had him wear a medical alert bracelet then in his Flolan backpack I had the USB. It was really helpful. I should invest in one for him now too.

        Here is a link to a past conversation similar to this one in case anyone wants to read former comments.

        Choosing a Medical ID Bracelet and What to Put on the Tag

      • #21758
        Brittany Foster
        Keymaster

        Barb,
        it amazes me that technology like this can really save a life ! You were so lucky that you had all that information available to them and I’m sure it really helped a lot. I know from personal experience with my sisters not knowing all the information, they have just reached into my backpack and pulled out a hard copy. Luckily my backpack with oxygen in it was something that I always wore at the time. But IF I didn’t have that with me or something that I always take with me, then I could see how that USB chip would come in handy and would be better than a bracelet that can sometimes only fit a small amount on it. My question was always “How do I only pick 4 conditions!?” LOL

      • #21775
        Jen Cueva
        Participant

        Hi Barb and welcome to the forums. I never knew that they have a MedicAlert bracelet with a USB. Wow. I am blown away by the technology that we have today. Although, I feel as if I am a tad behind the times, especially now, Haha

        This is a great idea and I am happy that you found us and shared this with us.

        • #21842
          Barb Jensen
          Participant

          Hi Jen, you are not the only one that has never seen this USB idea. When I went into the hospital, I was amazed how many doctors and nurses had not seen or heard of it. They all passed by to tell me that too. I got called the star patient, or the patient of the day! I do also have my meds listed in my phone on a notepad app that I got.

          Another emergent “plan ahead ideas”, is that you have your next of kin in you phone as “ICE”, which stands for “In Case of Emergency”. Most paramedics or ER staff know to look at your contacts in your phone for this. For example, I have:

          ICE #1 Adam 1st son
          ICE #2 Jeri (Adams wife, a nurse)
          ICE #3 Carlie. 2nd son
          ICE #4 Alec, 3rd son
          They like to have them numbered. I used to teach this and USB in a safety class at the hospital that I used to work at, but I am still amazed how many patients don’t do it or they don’t have a med list on them, etc. Have a great Thanksgiving!

        • #21850
          Colleen Steele
          Keymaster

          Barb,
          This is true. I think even the medical field gets too accustomed to an old way of doing things that a new and better way sometimes gets missed until a patient like you comes along. I really like the USB option but I still keep paper copies as well. Doctor’s especially seem to prefer glancing over the paper copy and I often hear, “I wish more patients would do this.”

          Thank you for sharing how you organize the USB to make it useful for not just one, all members of your family.

    • #21859
      Brittany Foster
      Keymaster

      I was just at the hospital myself today and the doctor was amazed at how much I knew about my medical conditions and the medication that I am taking. I can’t imagine NOT knowing. But there have been some time that I couldn’t exactly speak for myself so it was helpful to have something to give to them or other people with me.

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